Astronomy a Go Go!
In the car, at work or under the night time sky astronomy goes where you go!
 

Contact Me

astronomyagogo at gmail.com

New untested mini-player
Alternate method: Press "POD" symbol
Next to Current Podcast Name

Vote for AAGG!

Another way to Support AAGG... Do your Amazon shopping here!
Free Monthly Sky Maps

AAGG on Twitter


AMP

Categories

Development
Moon
Earth
Tools
Constellations
Tips and Tricks
Planets
Deep Sky Objects
Sky Tours
Eclipse
Solar system
Stars
general
Solar
News Updates
Problems

Syndication


CURRENT MOON
Northern Hemisphere
SH rotate 180 degrees
moon phase info
AAGG Listeners

Archives

September
August
June
May
March
February
January

December
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
July
May
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

December

Keyword Search

Postings

November 2006
S M T W T F S
     
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30

<div><a href="http://share.skype.com/in/26/241411" target="_blank"><img src=" http://share.skype.com/show/flash/?id=26" border="0" alt="Share Skype" id="skype-banner-img" width="120" height="60" /></a></div> Call me!

podsafe music network

Carpe Noctem - Seize the Night!

excerpt from "Works and Days"

"And if longing seizes you for sailing the stormy seas,
when the Pleiades flee mighty Orion
and plunge into the misty deep
and all the gusty winds are raging,
then do not keep your ship on the wine-dark sea
but, as I bid you, remember to work the land."

Hesiod, presumably lived around 700 BCE



Victoria Crater. Image credit: NASA/JPL/HiRISE (Thanks to Fraser at Universe Today)

Michael this one is for you! Does it remind you of the SARLACC PIT from Episode VI? But wait there is more...WHAT makes straight parallel lines on Mars?



Listener Feedback

URL for the 7 Mag Charts Table of Contents
Jim has had great luck with this red light/ white light head lamp from Lowes
I picked up something similar from Home Depot and just love it! Unfortunately I can't find it on the internet site.

Sun

There are two nice sunspots just appearing 926 and 927

Planets



Evening Planets
Be ready around Dec 7th-11th with Mercury, Jupiter and Mars on converge on one another LOW on the pre-dawn sky!
  • Venus - Mag -3.8 but currently lost in the Sun's glare.
  • Neptune - Mag +7.9 in Capricorn will also be better for dark evenings and is less than 1 degree north of the +4.3 magnitude star Iota Capricorni
  • Uranus - Mag +5.8 in Aquarius Uranus is best seen in a dark moonless sky away from artificial lighting. It may be seen looking like a very faint star to the dark-adapted naked eye that shimmers in and out of visibility just under 1 degree east of Lambda Aquarii. Find the tipped over letter Y of Aquarius, go 4 thumbwidths southeast to find Lambda, and then a smidgen Southwest.
  • Saturn - Mag 0.4 on the western edge of Leo just west of Regulus.


Morning Planets
  • Jupiter - Mag -1.6 currently lost in the Sun's glare.
  • Mars - Mag 1.6 just barely above the Sun's glare between the Sun and Mercury
  • Mercury - Mag -0.5 barely 5 degrees off the horizon. Use the bright orange/red Arcturus and "spike" almost horizontally South to Spica. Mercury sits 25 degrees ESE of Spica.
  • Saturn - Mag 0.4 on the western edge of Leo just west of Regulus.

Constellations



Time for a quiz!

Fornax
- the Furnace - Invented by Lacaille during his stay at the Cape of Good Hope in 1751 - 1752 (who else!)

Indus - the Indian (Native American?) Invented by Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman between 1595 and 1597 Epsilon Indi is one of the closest stars (17th)to Earth, approximately 11.82 light years away. Proxima Centauri is the closest at 4.2 light years away.

Viewing

Naked eye - the Pleiades


Mentioned by Homer about 750 B.C.At least 6 member stars are visible to the naked eye, while under moderate conditions this number increases to 9, and under clear dark skies jumps up to more than a dozen

The Pleiades nebulae are blue-colored, which indicates that they are reflection nebulae, reflecting the light of the bright stars situated near (or within) them. The brightest of these nebulae, that around Merope, was discovered on October 19, 1859 by Ernst Wilhelm Leberecht (Wilhelm) Tempel at Venice (Italy) with a 4-inch refractor; it is included in the NGC as NGC 1435.

The Pleiades also carry the name "Seven Sisters"; according to Greek mythology, seven daughters and their parents.

In the Maori language, Matariki is the name of the constellation Pleiades. In traditional times, Matariki was a season to celebrate and to prepare the ground for the coming year. Offerings of the produce of the land were made to the gods, including Rongo. This time of the year was also a good time to instruct young people in the lore of the land and the forest. as well, certain birds and fish were especially easy to harvest at this time.

Binocular -
Drift from the Pleiades through the sword of Orion (M42, NGC 1976, NGC 1977) the Great Orion Nebula
Continue ENE and head to the middle of Cancer and M44 the Beehive Cluster

Telescope -
Northern Hemisphere chart

M38 - open cluster mag 8 (NGC 1912)
M36 - open cluster mag 9 (NGC 1960)
M37 - open cluster mag 11 (NGC 2099)
M35 - open cluster mag 8 (NGC 2168) and near by NGC 2158

Southern Hemisphere chart

The Moon

Images created with Lunar Phase Pro

Our beautiful lunar photos are courtesy of Frank Barrett at celestialwonders.com I recommend visiting his site and checking out his lunar phase photos. You can zoom in for more detail.



Spanning 56 miles and descending 13,800 feet below lunar surface, Tycho�s massive walls are 13 miles thick. As one of the youngest craters, Tycho might not look like much tonight, but it is surely one of the most impressive of all features when the Moon reaches Full. Look around Tycho for six small craters encircling it like an old analog telephone dial. To the southeast, another prominent feature calls attention to itself - Maginus. Power up and look closely at the more than 50 meteoritic impacts that have all but destroyed it. The very largest of the wall craters is on the southwest crest and is named Maginus C. On the outer north wall, look for less conspicuous Proctor. It, too, has been struck many times!

Gifts for the Astronomer!

Do it yourself (DIY) gifts
There are so many creative things you can do for your astronomer, or for yourself, that won't cost and arm and a leg! Consider the following:
  • "Rite in the Rain" paper - perfect for creating your own lists without having to pull them in and out of sheet protectors.
  • Hats, scarves, mitten (especially with flaps so you have finger access)
  • Renovate an old hard sided Samsonite style suitcase for observing! Paint it and find some nice foam padding for the inside.
  • Cold weather observing 'basket' - Be Creative!! a good thermos, hot cocoa, snacks, handwarmers, and maybe a favorite CD all 'wrapped' in a new accessory case
  • Warm weather observing 'basket' - Have Fun!! snacks, a nice wide brim hat, some new shades, Miracool bandana, some oil free sunscreen and bug spray, all 'wrapped' in a Pelican case
  • Online Star Atlases - print them out, put them in protective sleeves, laminate them or print them on waterproof paper and bind them into a book that will open flat!
  • Fraser Cain at Universe Today emailed to let me know that there will be a "What's up 2007" so keep an eye on his site!
  • My favorite give-away Messier Telrad Charts - by John Small courtesy of the Amateur Telescope Makers of Boston.
  • Messier Telrad Charts - From Utah Skies
  • Caldwell Telrad Charts - From Utah Skies
For the woodworkers out there...

Binocular Mounts
Observing Chair - example or the Cats Perch Plans

On to the shopping...
Telescope accessories

Woodland Hills Camera and Telescope is offering a 5% discount for any AAGG listener! Just put "AAGG" in the discount code box at checkout to receive your discount.

Off the scope

References
Atlases
Planisphere
Books
...there are just toooo many but here is a start....

Comets

Comets for the Month.

Check out the Sky Hound site.
"One touch of nature makes the whole world kin"
-- Shakespeare

Email us at astronomyagogo   AT  gmail  DOT com or leave a note in our show notes at www.astronomy.libsyn.com
Help us out by leaving a donation in the ol' PayPal hat

Woodland Hills Camera and Telescope is offering FREE web hosting on our servers for you or your organization's website. In order to promote the hobbies of Astronomy, Astrophotography, Photography, Birding or generally any topic that is of interest to our customer base, Woodland Hills Camera and Telescope is offering Hosting Grants.


Direct download: AAGGshow33.mp3
Category:Deep Sky Objects -- posted at: 8:00 AM